Open Call for Volunteers and Organizers!

Open Call for Volunteers and Organizers!

In anticipation of our next annual event (September 30th, 2017), the March To End Rape Culture is seeking new volunteers and organizers. We're looking for help leading up to the event (including fundraising and outreach), as well as help making the actual march and rally the best event possible! If you're interested, please head on over to our volunteering page and let us know how you can help. Thanks!

Help fund the 2017 March To End Rape Culture!

Help fund the 2017 March To End Rape Culture!

The 2017 March To End Rape Culture is right around the corner on September 30th! We're currently raising funds to put on this year's event (expenses include equipment rental, an ASL interpreter, snacks for volunteers, web hosting fees, the event permit, and online+IRL promotional materials). So for anyone who's interested in helping out or spreading the word:

Loraine Ballard Morrill of Iheartradio Interviews MTERC Organizer Robin Strough

Loraine Ballard Morrill of Iheartradio Interviews MTERC Organizer Robin Strough
Some may remember the story of a woman who went to Toronto police after she was raped and was told by an officer that "women should avoid dressing like sluts." This incident  sparked a movement and here in Philadelphia the  March to End Rape Culture.  Loraine Ballard Morrill spoke with one of the organizers Robin Strough about the event which takes place September 24, 2016 at the Thomas Paine Plaza, Philadelphia starting at 11:00.

Performer Lineup: The Means, Girls Rock Philly, Janee Latrice and Wassup Gina!

Performer Lineup: The Means, Girls Rock Philly, Janee Latrice and Wassup Gina!

We're thrilled to announce our performer lineup for this year's march, featuring an eclectic mix of girls and women from across the Philly music scene: The Means, Girls Rock Philly, and Janee Latrice, and Wassup Gina! The performances cap off our event after the march and speeches by Ronald Savage, Tationnah Carter from Morris Home, Sethe Lamming & Kay Cohen from the Philly Survivor Support Network and more. Check out the full rundown on the march here, if you're unfamiliar with us read about why we're marching, and don't forget to invite your friends! Here's music and links for our artists:

C.J. Asher Interviews Christie Eastburn, March To End Rape Culture Organizer

C.J. Asher Interviews Christie Eastburn, March To End Rape Culture Organizer

"Whether it be something as seemingly benign as cat-calling or as extreme as a rapist receiving a lenient jail sentence because their accuser was intoxicated or the rapists’ privilege, rape culture is a persistent and serious problem in today’s society. On the front lines of the battle to expose and eliminate rape culture is Christie Eastburn, organizer of Philadelphia’s annual March To End Rape Culture."

Speakers Announced!

Speakers Announced!

The following speakers have been confirmed for the 2016 March to End Rape Culture:

DJ Wassup Gina has also been confirmed, and more performers are TBA!

Here's an interview with Ronald Savage from New York Daily News:

Transgender DNC Delegate Calls Out Sex-Work Shamers

Transgender DNC Delegate Calls Out Sex-Work Shamers

At this year's Democratic National Convention (DNC), Pennsylvania activist Sharron Cooks was one of 28 openly transgender delegates and two trans women-of-color delegates. She's also a former sex worker. Unfortunately but unsurprisingly, it's this last bit that The Philadelphia Inquirer columnist Jenice Armstrong chose to focus on.

The Bi-College News 'Philadelphia’s SlutWalk: March to End Rape Culture'

The Bi-College News 'Philadelphia’s SlutWalk: March to End Rape Culture'

On the cold and windy morning of October 3, I bundled up in two shirts and a jacket to march through downtown Philadelphia. But beside me, dozens walked naked as part of the 2015 March to End Rape Culture (MTERC), also known as “my body, my choice.”

Spearheaded by the Haverford Women*s Center, a group of about 20 Bryn Mawr and Haverford students went to Thomas Payne Plaza to take part in the MTERC rally. Formerly known as the “Slutwalk,” the march was, according to the official website, “rebranded as the March to End Rape Culture in an effort to be more inclusive and appeal to a wider audience.” Walkers were welcomed by local organizations such as “Philly Queer” and “Philadelphia Socialist.” ...

Her Campus Temple News 'Philadelphia Marches to End Rape Culture'

The March to End Rape Culture, formally known as the “Slut Walk”, is an event that has been occurring in cities all throughout the country for the last five years. For Philadelphia, thisyear’s march occurred on Oct. 3rd at 11 a.m. beginning at JFK Boulevard. It is the 3rd consecutive year that Philadelphia has participated in holding the event. Each year has had much larger turnouts than the previous, as well as more experienced speakers. The event attracted a widely diverse group of men and women and a wide range of guests, speakers and sponsorships. Many of the speakers had colorful voices all with unique perspectives on the event’s cause and future fights. Some told stories, others read poetry, and powerful speeches were given at the beginning and end of the march.

After the speakers were finished there were several dance and musical performances. One dance troop, “The —— Regime” featured group of talented young women who did routines to songs “featuring strong female leads” such as Nicki Minaj, Beyonce, and Rihanna. By adding musical guests and performers, the organizers really added a modern touch that had been missing among previous years.

The Temple News 'Marching to end oppression'

The Temple News 'Marching to end oppression'

Under gray skies at the 2015 March to End Rape Culture, Nellie Fitzpatrick relayed the story of Chrissy Lee Polis, a transgender woman who was beaten in 2011 after attempting to use a women’s bathroom.

“This happened to Chrissy because of how these people perceived her,” said Fitzpatrick, the city’s director of LGBT Affairs. “Because she wasn’t good enough to simply do what every single person here does every day: go to the bathroom.”

Three days after the march, Philadelphia witnessed the 18th murder of a transgender woman of color in America this year when 22-year-old Kiesha Jenkins was attackedin Logan. Police arrested a man in connection to the murder yesterday.

Temple Update 'Center City’s March to End Rape Culture'

Temple Update 'Center City’s March to End Rape Culture'

This past Saturday people came together for the annual March to End Rape Culture. The march aims to spread awareness of rape culture and its affect on society.

Kaitlynd Knorr one of the march’s organizer stated,”It raises awareness and it puts it in people’s minds. It’s a taboo subject that people may not want to talk about.”

The march came to Philly in 2011 and was previously known as the “SlutWalk.” The name of the march was changed in 2013 in order to include a wider audience.

From “Slutwalk” to March: Philadelphia Brings Rape Culture Awareness

From “Slutwalk” to March: Philadelphia Brings Rape Culture Awareness

As Anna Frangiosa patiently sits, bundled on the brisk October morning, gripping tightly to her homemade signs, she knows the two-mile march is worth it.

Burlesque performer and resident of North Philadelphia, 39-year-old Frangiosa has always advocated against sexual violence and the victimization of women in American culture. Helping raise awareness of rape against women, the March to End Rape Culture is the first united event she ever attended in the city to stop “victim blaming.”

“I think there’s still a lot of people who think this is a joke and obviously it’s not. It’s important that people be visible about this as a way of encouraging gender equality and ending rape.” Frangiosa goes on to explain how the media subjugates women, who eventually become only pawns in a man’s chess game.

Philly.com 'What is 'Rape Culture' and how can you fight it?

Philly.com 'What is 'Rape Culture' and how can you fight it?

Supposedly, our culture is opposed to rape. We like to think that all good people are as offended by sexual assault as they are by, say, cannibalism. Yet, rape happens every day to people of all ages.

And the perpetrators aren’t all barbarous, dead-eyed monsters; they’re other humans, often close to those they abuse. Rapists can have loving families and respectable jobs; they are simply people who choose, for some reason, to disregard consent.

Pretending that rape only happens in specific communities or is a crime committed by certain types of people is a fairy tale that allows us to avoid looking at how our culture allows sexual assault to happen.

Rape culture” is increasingly being used to talk about the ways we implicitly condone rape, make it easier for it to happen and harder to combat. It refers to the ways that we talk about sex, gender, relationships and power that inadvertently contribute to a climate where people are put at risk and disbelieved when they try to report. What are some examples?

The College of New Jersey Signal 'Elephant in the Room: Why I dressed up as Thor for Philly’s March to End Rape Culture'

The College of New Jersey Signal 'Elephant in the Room: Why I dressed up as Thor for Philly’s March to End Rape Culture'

Just this past Saturday, Thomas Paine Plaza was flooded with over 1,000 feminist activists and supporters for Philly’s March to End Rape Culture. Many walked around topless, some wore tight-fitting, short dresses which are the garments that rape is often blamed on, and others wore the clothes that they were wearing when they were sexually assaulted. What did I wear this weekend amongst the sea of half-naked, beautiful, powerful activists? You guessed it! A Thor costume.

It’s strange to think that cosplaying Thor is a multifaceted and complex decision or functions as anything more significant than simply demonstrating an admiration for a fictional character. Thor is the god of thunder, child of Oden, heir to the throne of Asgard, and owner of a powerful hammer called Mjolnir that can both create force fields and destroy anything in its path. It’s simple — Thor is kickass, who wouldn’t want to dress up as this demigod? But being Thor this past weekend was as symbolic and as substantial for me as the march itself.

Philadelphia Weekly 'Because only yes means yes: Have better sex and end rape culture along the way'

Philadelphia Weekly 'Because only yes means yes: Have better sex and end rape culture along the way'

Af­firm­at­ive con­sent not only re­moves any doubt about wheth­er a situ­ation was mu­tu­al, it makes for bet­ter sex, too. 

A bold idea is gain­ing trac­tion on Amer­ica’s col­lege cam­puses: Sex is a col­lab­or­at­ive com­mu­nic­a­tion, not just a green light to use someone’s body as an or­gasm-pro­cure­ment device. Stu­dents are be­ing taught to prac­tice af­firm­at­ive con­sent, mov­ing bey­ond the old “no means no” to the more co­oper­at­ive “yes means yes.” In­stead of put­ting the onus on an in­di­vidu­al to fend off un­wanted sexu­al activ­ity, the re­spons­ib­il­ity to pre­vent rape is on every­body—each par­ti­cipant needs to get (and give) clear, en­thu­si­ast­ic in­dic­a­tions of be­ing on board.

All af­firm­at­ive con­sent means is that every­one agrees to what is hap­pen­ing. You have to be old enough/able to un­der­stand the situ­ation, and you have to be free from pres­sure—that is, just as eas­ily free to say “no” as “yes.” At any time, con­sent can be re­voked. Mak­ing sure your part­ner is game is an on­go­ing pro­cess, and please note: It’s something that hap­pens nat­ur­ally if you’re ac­tu­ally any good at sex.

A good lov­er bases their move­ments and pa­cing upon read­ing how their part­ner is re­spond­ing. I don’t just round the next base be­cause I want to, that is, but be­cause wewant to. For those whodon’t pay at­ten­tion to the oth­er per­son’s pleas­ure, on the oth­er hand, get­ting af­firm­at­ive con­sent is in­deed an ex­tra step. So un­der­stand: Some body part get­ting hard or wet isn’t the same as giv­ing con­sent. Those are things bod­ies do, usu­ally out­side con­scious con­trol. That’s why it’s a good idea to in­clude verbal com­mu­nic­a­tion, too. Some worry about sound­ing too busi­ness­like and killing the vibe, but there’s no rule that says you can’t make the ques­tion sound ro­mantic—or com­pletely filthy dirty.

Philadelphia Higher Education Network for Neighborhood Development: 'March to End Rape Culture'

The March to End Rape Culture is an annual march through center city raising awareness about rape culture and how it affects everyone in society today. This event will be a monumental occasion for Philadelphian’s to learn about the widespread issues related to rape culture and what can be done to put an end to it. It is also a supportive and empowering place for survivors of rape and abuse to speak out and discover local resources that are ready and willing to help everyone overcome the obstacles that society has placed in front of them. Lastly, the march is the perfect opportunity for allies to join with survivors in taking a stand against rape culture and say ENOUGH!

The Daily Pennsylvanian 'Penn students march to end rape culture'

The Daily Pennsylvanian 'Penn students march to end rape culture'

“Sluts are like unicorns: They are both imaginary concepts.”

“My clothes are not my consent.”

“Only yes means yes.”

The participants of Saturday’s March to End Rape Culture carried signs speaking out against sexual violence and objectification. More than 500 Philadelphians, 50 Penn students among them, gathered at Love Park to protest rape culture. The Philadelphia march, formerly known as the SlutWalk, started in Toronto in 2011 as a response to police comment that women should avoid dressing like “sluts” to avoid unwanted sexual attention. It has since spread to cities around the U.S. and the world.

HerCampus 'Philly Marches to End Rape Culture'

HerCampus 'Philly Marches to End Rape Culture'

As I enter the Thomas Paine Plaza at City Hall, I immediately see a swarm of people. According to CBS, about 1,000 people showed up to The March to End Rape Culture protest, formerly known as the Slutwalk, on September 27th.

I’d heard of The March to End Rape Culture before, but this was the first time I attended one of their events. It was an event I’ll never forget. Despite the seriousness of the protest, the atmosphere was so welcoming; everyone was happy to share a common goal to stop victim blaming and raise awareness of rape culture in our society. For those that do not know, rape culture is defined as when rape and other acts of sexual violence is considered the norm in a society.